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Posts from the ‘Teacher to Teacher’ Category

Giving Thanks

Showing gratitude is one of the simplest yet most powerful things humans can do for each other. 

~Randy Pausch

When was the last time you received a handwritten thank you note or wrote one? As Thanksgiving approaches, I am reminded of one of my favorite writing activities – writing thank you notes. My classes spend some time discussing the importance of saying thank you. We talk about reasons why you would send someone a thank you note, and of course, the students usually say, “When you get a birthday present.”  When I ask how many of them write handwritten thank you notes, very few of them raise their hands. Since the world moved to electronic devices and social media, a handwritten note has become a lost art, but one that is very satisfying when resurrected. 

To get started, I have the students brainstorm a list of people in their lives who deserve their thanks but are often taken for granted.  The list includes obvious people like parents and grandparents, but as we continue to talk the list grows to include bus drivers, crossing guards, maintenance staff, school secretaries, coaches, neighbors, and even siblings.

Once we have our list compiled, I introduce the activity.  Each student will write a handwritten note to someone they need to thank. Some of them still aren’t sure, so  I read a few picture books for inspiration. I have included a shortlist below. If you have a favorite, please add it in the comments.  I am always looking for more.

Ten Thank You Letters by Daniel Kirk 

I Am Thankful by Suzy Capozzi

Thankful by Eileen Spinelli

Being Thankful by Mercer Mayer

Grateful: A Song of Giving Thanks by John Bucchino

Thanks a Million by Nikki Grimes

Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco

The Thank You Letter by Jane Cabrera

Next, we talk about what should go into a thank you note, such as: tell your recipient what you are thanking them for; be sure to expand on why you are thankful for the gift or act and add a closing statement that is directed toward the recipient. Students then write their rough drafts.

I provide the note cards.  I try to get a variety so that everyone has a chance to choose one that suits their personalities.  You can get note cards on sale during the year, purchase them at the dollar store, or use those spare ones hanging around your house.  The kids provide the addresses and the stamp.  

Lastly, the students write their letters (I take a quick peek to make sure there are no glaring errors), address the envelopes, (which is a lesson in itself), and affix the stamp (another lesson). I am tasked with dropping them off at the post office.  

The kids always look and feel satisfied with themselves as they hand me their letters, but that is nothing compared to how they look and feel when they receive feedback from the recipients.  They learn that small gestures can make a great impact on someone else.

I can’t tell you what a difference thank you notes made in my life a few weeks ago.  After a few rough days at school, I was surprised by a large yellow envelope in my mailbox.  Inside were these lovely thank you notes from some teachers in Springfield Delco School District.  In early October, I presented in their PAWLP class, and they sent me handwritten thank you notes. The evening I presented they were all so gracious and said thank you which I appreciated, but the fact that they took time to write me a personal note really made me feel special and lifted my spirits at the perfect time.

Thank you notes

Who is on your thank you list?  Whose life will you or your students brighten with handwritten notes?  I look forward to your ideas in the comments, and thank you for reading this post!

 

Creating Balance: Nurturing Your Teacher Self

pawlp

As a new school year begins, teachers come armed with new or revised lesson plans and renewed excitement ready to give our students the best of ourselves so that they can be their best selves. Sometimes giving the best of ourselves comes with a price. In our quest to be a great teacher as well as parent, partner, caregiver, or one of the many other titles each of us wear, we often put our own needs last, which is the worst thing we could do to ourselves.  In my quest to redefine my work/life balance and reduce school year stress, I read many self-help articles and had several conversations with my daughter and sister, both of whom work in the mental health field, and found many commonalities. Here are a few strategies that stood out to me.  I hope at least one will work for you.

 

  • Prioritize – Be sure that you differentiate between what “must” and what you would “like” to get accomplished.
    • Be realistic; you cannot do everything.
    • Make a schedule to help you use your time more efficiently.
  • Schedule “Me Time” – If you don’t put yourself on your calendar chances are you will not make or take time for yourself.
    • Get a massage.
    • Take in a movie.
    • Meet up with a friend.
    • Read for pleasure
  • Manage Your Mind – The most important voice in your life is your own.  Listen to your body and practice positive self-talk.  Don’t beat yourself up. When feeling stressed take a mini break.
    • Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths.
    • Take a walk.
    • Listen to music.
    • Look at cherished pictures – your kids, grandkids, a favorite vacation spot.
  • Keep a Gratitude Journal – At the end of the school day or before you go to bed, take a few minutes to reflect on your day and write down a few things for which you are thankful. Not only will this help you to focus on the positive parts of your day, but on a difficult day you can revisit your entries and assure yourself that “this too shall pass.”

 

Gratitude journal

A page from my own gratitude journal

  • Establish Boundaries – While you may not have a “job” that allows you to leave work at work, you do not have to be available 24/7.
    • Decide on a reasonable time to “unplug” each evening to stop checking your work email.
    • Establish a time limit for grading or engaging in social media.
    • Stop saying “Yes,” to every request.  Be selective with how you use your precious free time.

 

These are just a few suggestions and strategies.  Obviously, you may not be able to do this right away but choose one and start small.  If you have others to add to the list, please share them in the comment section below. Teachers do important work.  We can’t make a difference in the lives of our students if we don’t treat ourselves with respect and kindness.  We are all in this together!

cropped-rita-2017 Rita DiCarne is a 2000 PAWLP Writing Fellow.  She teaches 7th grade ELA at Our Lady of Mercy Regional Catholic School in Maple Glen, PA.  Rita married her high school sweetheart 39 years ago and with him she shares two wonderful children, their fabulous spouses, and four fantastic grandchildren!

Snorkeling and Scuba Diving in an Undergraduate General Education Literature Course: Diving into the Educational Theory Behind “Next” Practices*

 by Mary Buckelew

Student Voices
“Before choosing
The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney for my self-selected book, I figured that I’d be reading aesthetically as I wanted to read for entertainment.  After reading, I can say I read mostly with an aesthetic lens, but I did read efferently at times to soak in new information regarding my major.” (Ethan, undergraduate criminal justice major)

“I wish I’d known about the different stances of reading long before this, and I wish my high school teachers hadn’t focused solely on the efferent aspects of reading and books. I only read books in high school to pass tests, write required papers, and other test oriented stuff . . . I don’t think my teachers knew that the aesthetic stance existed. Even summer reading was always selected for us and then we were tested – efferent all the way.” (Sarah, undergraduate biology pre-med major)

“I now like to think about how I am reading, why I am reading, and I even apply efferent and aesthetic to other classes and life in general.” (“Honest Anonymous Feedback” from the end of the semester evaluations, Lit. 165 2:00)

Sarah, Ethan, and the anonymous student were enrolled in my Literature 165 classes this past spring semester. They shared these ideas in their final reflections and in final evaluations. 

Read more

Faces of Advocacy: Reflections on the 2016 NWP and the NCTE Conferences

The theme of the 2016 National Council of Teachers of English was Faces of Advocacy. A theme that couldn’t have been more timely. NCTE’s call for proposals included the following: “Many times as educators, we feel defeated and incapable of making change of any sort. This [NCTE] conference is your opportunity to rise to the challenge of who you are as a teacher or teacher leader – celebrate and discuss the possibilities that lie ahead of us.” There was definitely celebration in finding a COMMUNITY of educators dedicated to a shared purpose – literacy, freedom, and agency for all. Advocacy. What are we doing to advocate and to inspire advocacy in our classrooms, buildings, community, and the world?

pawlp dinner

L to R: Mary Buckelew, Lynne Dorfman, Rita Sorrentino, Janice Ewing, Tricia Ebarvia, and Kelly Virgin

In this post, PAWLP Fellows Rita Sorrentino, Janice Ewing, Pauline Schmidt, Kelly Virgin, Patty Koller, and Tricia Ebarvia share some of their takeaways from this year’s NWP and NCTE conferences. We encourage readers to respond. Please share your strategies for teaching and inspiring advocacy and service. We also urge teachers to attend and present at local, regional, and national conferences to renew the professional spirit.

– Mary Buckelew Read more

Teacher to Teacher: Why I Use Picture Books as Mentor Texts

By Lynne R. Dorfman

If you are teaching the qualities of good writing, all you need are some picture books! Why picture books? Picture books provide the models that will help students grow as writers. They have vivid vocabulary—word choice is so important! They have beautiful illustrations or photographs, adding another layer to the text to motivate and engage our struggling readers and writers. Teachers can read them aloud in one sitting, but also return to them throughout the year as mentor texts to imitate. Students can also return to picture books independently to help them take a risk and try out something new. Sometimes, students will gather a set of books by an author to study one craft move that an author has used across some of the texts he has published.  Read more

Teacher to Teacher: Promoting Greater Independence in Writing Workshop

By Lynne R. Dorfman

It is always a challenge to teach writing and run an effective writing workshop, but part of the problem may be our reluctance to set our writers free. We must trust that they will make good choices, use materials and their time appropriately, be able to offer advice to each other, and assess their own writing and set goals.  It is important to realize that we are not the only teacher in the classroom. Our classroom is a giant think tank, a community of writers that can come together in many different formats to assist, advise, critique, and challenge. Read more